Broker Check
2022-2023 Tax Brackets And Federal Income Tax Rates

2022-2023 Tax Brackets And Federal Income Tax Rates

January 05, 2023
Share |

2022-2023 Tax Brackets And Federal Income Tax Rates

Higher-income earners in the United States face higher tax rates. The federal government collects taxes through the use of tax rates and tax brackets. The federal government collects taxes through the use of tax rates and tax brackets

The tax rate is the percentage of an individual's or a company's taxable income. Income is classified into "tax brackets," or ranges, with varying tax rates based on where a person or business falls within that range. Individuals in the United States are taxed in seven different brackets, ranging from 10% to 37%. 

To summarize, tax rates are the percentages used to calculate an individual's or company's tax liability, and tax brackets are the income levels above which specific tax rates apply. The 2023 tax brackets have been released, and their top rates are 7% higher than those of the 2022 tax year. 

Raising the thresholds and expanding the number of tax brackets reduces the likelihood that taxpayers will face the highest marginal tax rates if their incomes do not keep up with inflation.

In this article, we'll take a closer look at 2022-2023 tax brackets and federal income tax rates and how they impact your tax liability. Whether you're a seasoned pro or a tax novice, we hope you'll find this information helpful and illuminating. 

2022 Federal Income Tax Brackets

In 2022, all income thresholds and filing requirements will be adjusted for inflation. To avoid "bracket creep," the IRS regularly updates more than 60 tax provisions for inflation. Inflation can cause "bracket creep," which occurs when taxpayers are pushed into a higher tax bracket or the value of tax credits and deductions decreases. 

The IRS has announced some new inflation adjustments for the tax year 2022, for which returns are due in early 2023. The following federal income tax brackets will be in effect in 2022: 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37%. 

Taxpayers with taxable incomes of more than $539,900 (single filers) or $647,850 (joint filers) will be subject to the top marginal income tax rate of 37%. As 2022 is the tax year, US citizens will file it in April 2023. The tax brackets are divided into the following. 

Single Filers Tax Brackets

Tax Rate

Taxable Income (Single)

Tax to be paid

10%

$0 to $10,275.

10% of taxable income.

12%

$10,276 to $41,775

$1,027.50 plus 12% of the amount over $10,275.

22%

$41,776 to $89,075

$4,807.50 plus 22% of the amount over $41,775.

24%

$89,076 to $170,050

$15,213.50 plus 24% of the amount over $89,075.

32%

$170,051 to $215,950

$34,647.50 plus 32% of the amount over $170,050.

35%

$215,951 to $539,900

$49,335.50 plus 35% of the amount over $215,950.

37%

$539,901 or more

$162,718 plus 37% of the amount over $539,900.

Married, Filing Jointly Tax Brackets

Tax Rate

Taxable Income (Married, Filing Jointly)

Tax to be paid

10%

$0 to $20,550.

10% of taxable income.

12%

$20,551 to $83,550

$2,055 plus 12% of the amount over $20,550.

22%

$83,551 to $178,150

$9,615 plus 22% of the amount over $83,550.

24%

$178,151 to $340,100

$30,427 plus 24% of the amount over $178,150.

32%

$340,101 to $431,900

$69,295 plus 32% of the amount over $340,100.

35%

$431,901 to $647,850

$98,671 plus 35% of the amount over $431,900.

37%

Over $647,850

$174,253.50 plus 37% of the amount over $647,850.

Married, Filing Separately Tax Brackets

Tax Rate

Taxable Income (Married, Filing Separately)

Tax to be paid

10%

Up to $10,275

10% of taxable income.

12%

$10,276 to $41,775

$1,027.50 plus 12% of the amount over $10,275.

22%

$41,776 to $89,075

$4,807.50 plus 22% of the amount over $41,775.

24%

$89,076 to $170,050

$15,213.50 plus 24% of the amount over $89,075.

32%

$170,051 to $215,950

$34,647.50 plus 32% of the amount over $170,050.

35%

$215,951 to $323,925

$49,335.50 plus 35% of the amount over $215,950.

37%

Over $332,925

$87,126.75 plus 37% of the amount over $323,925.

Head of Household Tax Brackets

Tax Rate

Taxable Income (Head of Household)

Tax to be paid

10%

Up to $14,650

10% of taxable income.

12%

$14,651 to $55,900

$1,465 plus 12% of the amount over $14,650.

22%

$55,901 to $89,050

$6,415 plus 22% of the amount over $55,900.

24%

$89,051 to $170,050

$13,708 plus 24% of the amount over $89,050.

32%

$170,051 to $215,950

$33,148 plus 32% of the amount over $170,050.

35%

$215,951 to $539,900

$47,836 plus 35% of the amount over $215,950.

37%

Over $539,900

$161,218.50 plus 37% of the amount over $539,900.

2023 Federal Income Tax Brackets

With the rising cost of living, many Americans will welcome the IRS's announcement of higher federal income tax brackets and standard deductions. The IRS adjusts the tax brackets annually to avoid "bracket creep," a phenomenon in which rising prices force filers into a higher income tax bracket despite no increase in actual income. 

The new tax brackets will be applied automatically when filing taxes, so taxpayers will not need to take any action. Because inflation has rapidly increased over the last year, the changes for 2023 are larger than in previous years.

The following table will illustrate the tax income and filing for 2023. This will help you file taxes for April 2024. 

Single Filers Tax Brackets

Tax Rate

Taxable Income (Single)

Tax to be paid

10%

Up to $11,000

10% of taxable income.

12%

$11,001 to $44,725

$1,100 plus 12% of the amount over $11,000.

22%

$44,726 to $95,375

$5,147 plus 22% of the amount over $44,725.

24%

$95,376 to $182,100

$16,290 plus 24% of the amount over $95,375.

32%

$182,101 to $231,250

$37,104 plus 32% of the amount over $182,100.

35%

$231,251 to $578,125

$52,832 plus 35% of the amount over $231,250.

37%

Over $578,125

$174,238.25 plus 37% of the amount over $578,125.

Married, Filing Jointly Tax Brackets

Tax Rate

Taxable Income (Married, Filing Jointly)

Tax to be paid

10%

Up to $22,000

10% of taxable income.

12%

$22,001 to $89,450

$2,200 plus 12% of the amount over $22,000.

22%

$89,451 to $190,75

$10,294 plus 22% of the amount over $89,450.

24%

$190,751 to $364,200

$32,580 plus 24% of the amount over $190,750.

32%

$364,201 to $462,500

$74,208 plus 32% of the amount over $364,200.

35%

$462,501 to $693,750

$105,664 plus 35% of the amount over $462,500.

37%

Over $693,750

$186,601.50 + 37% of the amount over $693,750.

Married, Filing Separately Tax Brackets

Tax Rate

Taxable Income (Married, Filing Separately)

Tax to be paid

10%

Up to $11,000

10% of taxable income.

12%

$11,001 to $44,725

$1,100 plus 12% of the amount over $11,000.

22%

$44,726 to $95,375

$5,147 plus 22% of the amount over $44,725.

24%

$95,376 to $182,100

$16,290 plus 24% of the amount over $95,375.

32%

$182,101 to $231,250

$37,104 plus 32% of the amount over $182,100.

35%

$231,251 to $346,875

$52,832 plus 35% of the amount over $231,250.

37%

More than $346,875

$93,300.75 plus 37% of the amount over $346,875.

Head of Household Tax Brackets

Tax Rate

Taxable Income (Head of Household)

Tax to be paid

10%

Up to $15,700

10% of taxable income.

12%

$15,701 to $59,850

$1,570 plus 12% of the amount over $15,700.

22%

$59,851 to $95,350

$6,868 plus 22% of the amount over $59,850.

24%

$95,351 to $182,100

$14,678 plus 24% of the amount over $95,350.

32%

$182,101 to $231,250

$35,498 plus 32% of the amount over $182,100.

35%

$231,251 to $578,100

$51,226 plus 35% of the amount over $231,250.

37%

More than $578,100

$172,623.50 plus 37% of the amount over $578,100.

What Are Tax Brackets and How They Work?

A progressive tax system is one in which tax rates gradually rise across a series of tax brackets (or a progressive tax rate system). Individuals pay a higher proportion of their income in taxes under a progressive tax structure. Under the United States' progressive tax system, those with higher incomes pay a greater proportion of their income in taxes.

The federal government of the United States uses tax brackets to determine an individual's tax liability. Calculating your taxable income is the first step in determining your total tax burden.

The amount of income left after deducting all deductions and exemptions from total taxable income is known as adjusted gross income (from jobs, investments, and other sources). You can calculate your tax liability using the tax brackets and a rough estimate of your taxable income.

Following the deduction of standard deductions and other tax breaks from a person's income, the remaining amount is taxable, which may include wages and investment gains. Overall, the tax system is more complicated than just tax brackets. Exemptions, credits, and deductions are just a few ways your tax liability can be reduced.

Typically, tax rates and brackets are adjusted annually to account for inflation and to avoid unfairly subjecting individuals or groups to higher tax rates or brackets. This keeps people from being taxed more than they should be because of inflated earnings rather than a genuine increase in their standard of living. The marginal tax rate is the percentage of additional income that is taxed.

With a marginal tax rate of 22% and a tax bracket of 22%, the government would collect 22% of your income above the bracket's threshold. If you qualify for a $1,000 tax credit, your tax liability will be reduced by $1,000, lowering your effective tax rate to 20%.

Various factors, including filing status, income, and tax deductions, affect your marginal and effective tax rates.

The capital gains tax applies to profits made on selling assets such as stocks, bonds, or real estate. Wages and salaries are taxed more than capital gains. The capital gains tax rate is determined by two factors: the asset's holding period and your personal tax bracket. Gains realized on assets held for one year or less in the United States are taxed at ordinary income rates.

The term "kiddie tax" refers to the tax on investment income paid by people under 18. (or under 24 if a full-time student). The tax discourages parents from giving their children money or property for their children to benefit from lower tax rates.

The Kiddie tax will apply if a child's investment income exceeds a certain threshold. The first $1,150 unearned income for a child with no earned income is tax-free beginning in 2022. The adult rate applies up to $1,150, after which the child rate takes effect. The parent's tax rate is applied when the child's annual income reaches $2,300.

How to Determine Your Tax Bracket

Each income level is taxed at a different rate, represented by tax brackets. The first step in determining your tax bracket is calculating your taxable income. The amount of money you make after deducting all allowable deductions and exemptions from your total income is your taxable income. To determine how much of your income is taxable, follow these steps.

  • To begin, total all of your earnings from the previous year. This includes your regular paycheck and any bonuses, interest, or dividends you may have received.
  • Charitable contributions, business expenses, and mortgage interest can all be deducted from your taxable income.
  • Subtract any legal exemptions, such as those for yourself, your spouse, and your dependents.

Tax brackets are determined by taxable income rather than total income. Even if your income exceeds the next tax bracket's threshold, you may still be subject to a lower rate. It's important to remember that tax rates can and do change from year to year, so double-check the most recent rates before filing your taxes.

Single Filers – Single filers are unmarried individuals with no dependents. Unless you are a head of household or a married couple filing separately, you will file as a single person. Tax brackets, rates, and taxable income differ for single filers. It is critical to select the correct filing status on your tax return.

Married, Filing Jointly – Married couples file jointly. Spouses can file a joint tax return. Couples who file jointly may pay fewer taxes than individuals who file separately. To claim married filing jointly, you must be legally separated from your spouse on the last day of the tax year. If you're married but live apart, you may be considered the head of the household.

Married, Filing Separately – Married couples who want to file separately can select "married filing separately." Individuals who file separately must report their income and deductions. Because each spouse's income is taxed separately, their total tax liability may increase. To claim married filing separately, you must be legally married but not living together on the last day of the tax year. If you're married but live apart, you may be considered the head of the household.

Head of Household – Nonmarried taxpayers who provide financial support for others can file as "head of household." Those who were married or legally cohabiting at the end of the tax year paid more than half of the home's maintenance costs and lived in the home for more than half of the year qualify for head of household filing status (except for temporary absences). Household heads may be eligible for a higher standard deduction and a lower tax rate. Choosing the proper filing status ensures that taxes are paid correctly.

Widow(er) – Widows who have not remarried by the fiscal year's end are eligible. If your spouse dies during the tax year, you may be eligible for widow status (or within the two years preceding the current tax year). You did not remarry before the end of the tax year and did not pay more than half of the home's maintenance costs. A higher standard deduction and a lower tax rate may benefit widows. It is critical to select the correct filing status on your tax return.

How to Calculate Your Taxable Income

Add up all your earnings to determine your taxable income (wages, salary, tips, interest, dividends, and so on). Finally, subtract any credits or exemptions for which you are eligible. How to Go About It:

  1. Gather your income documentation, including W-2s, 1099s, and anything else that may be relevant.
  2. Your total income should be the sum of all of your income.
  3. Determine which write-offs are available to you. This category may include charitable contributions, business expenses, mortgage interest, and other similar items.
  4. Determine how much money you can save by claiming all available deductions.
  5. Determine which exemptions you might be able to use. These may be available to you, your spouse, and any dependents you have.
  6. Determine the total number of exemptions available to you.
  7. Take your total income and subtract applicable deductions and exemptions to determine your taxable income.

You should be aware that certain exemptions and deductions are conditional on factors such as your filing status and income level. If you need assistance determining which deductions and exemptions you are eligible for, consult a tax professional or review IRS guidelines.

The money earned before taxes and deductions is referred to as gross income. Gross income is total earnings before taxes (wages, salary, tips, interest, dividends, etc.).

Deduct certain expenses, such as traditional IRA contributions or student loan interest, to calculate your adjusted gross income (AGI). Before calculating your AGI, determine your gross income.

Certain expenses are deducted from taxable income. Standard and itemized deductions are available. You can take the standard deduction, which is a fixed dollar amount, or you can itemize your deductions, which are specific expenses.

Before adding their totals, determine which deductions apply to you. Certain exemptions and deductions are available based on your filing status and income.

One's "gross income" is calculated before taxes and deductions. Income before taxes is referred to as gross income (wages, salary, tips, interest, dividends, and so on).

The adjusted gross income of a person is their gross income less certain deductions, such as IRA contributions and student loan interest (AGI). First, determine your gross income.

Certain expenses can be deducted from taxable income. Standard and itemized deductions are available. You can take the standard deduction, which is a monetary amount, or you can itemize your deductions, which are specific expenses.

You should be aware that certain exemptions and deductions are conditional on factors such as your filing status and income level. If you need assistance determining which deductions and exemptions you are eligible for, consult a tax professional or review IRS guidelines.

Earned and unearned income are both classified as taxable funds. Unearned income includes debt forgiveness, strike pay, lottery winnings, and government assistance. Earned income includes gains from the sale of appreciated assets during the year and dividend and interest payments. Individuals can either take the standard deduction or itemize their deductions for tax purposes.

How to Get into a Lower Tax Bracket

Reduce your taxable income or increase your tax deductions to move into a lower tax bracket. With a bit of planning, you can avoid overpaying taxes every year. Tax rates are divided into tiers, or brackets, based on the income level of the filers. There are several ways you may be able to lower your tax bracket and reduce the amount of income tax you owe:

  • Increase your deductions
  • Contribute to a 401(k) or another retirement account
  • Claim credits
  • Adjust your tax withholding
  • Structure your income and investments

Diddel and Diddel have a strong representation of associate lawyers with the tools and skills of a person. The consultancy is free, and the financial supervisor closely looks at the income status before compiling tax returns.

Diddel and Diddel give you all legal advice and offer a solution for your problem, whether you are a big firm or small business owner. We provide a practical approach and determine the best results. We understand the importance of saving income and lowering the tax brackets. 

If you need any help, call us at: 203.708.9033 or email us at: Info@diddel.com